Monthly Archives: November 2008

Votemeal Cookies

Today’s the day! If you’re reading this, take a break and go vote. If you’ve already voted, great! You may continue reading for a truly inspirational cookie recipe.

I’m presenting friends, family, coworkers, and you, dear reader, with these delicious oatmeal chocolate cookies to say thanks for voting. There are few things as important to the health of our nation, and few things can make you feel as much a part of the community. Even if you don’t consider yourself especially political, the simple act of casting a ballot renews your stake in the country. It’s the clearest way to say, yes, I am part of this community and my opinion matters.

It’s especially important to vote if you feel ignored or cheated by the government, if your values are under-represented, if you disagree with the laws being passed and the way those laws are enforced. This is a duty to the country, but it is also a duty to yourself. If you take part in choosing who represents you, then they are accountable to you. So thank you for voting, and making sure the people in office are the ones we choose.

This is my tried-and-true oatmeal cookie recipe, a combination of my favorite cookie characteristics. So these cookies are not dense and cakey, thin and crunchy, or soft and soggy – they’re crisp on the outside and soft inside with bursts of chocolate and cinnamon. I’m also including Ian’s recipe for spicy cinnamon glaze, which makes the cookies unforgettable.

Here’s hoping we’re about to start four years of responsible, accountable, trustworthy leadership. And delicious cookies, of course.

Votemeal Cookies

  • 1 stick of butter, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 egg
  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats
  • 3/4 cup chocolate chips or chopped chocolate

Preheat oven to 325. Beat butter and sugar together in a stand mixer or with a wooden spoon until smooth. Stir in cinnamon, baking soda, and salt. Beat in egg and vanilla. Gently stir in flour until there are just a few white streaks, then mix in oats. Stir in chocolate chips. Form tablespoon-sized balls of dough on baking sheets, and bake 8-10 minutes, rotating trays halfway through. When completely cool, drizzle cookies with glaze. Serve to fellow voters, and make sure to eat two or three yourself to keep up your strength for the long night of poll-watching ahead. Makes 24 cookies, can be doubled and still fit comfortably in a KitchenAid.

Ian’s Cinnamon Cider Glaze

  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 3/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 Tbs apple cider

Stir all ingredients together until smooth. You may need a tiny bit more cider, so increase the liquid 1/2 tsp at a time. This is enough glaze for a judicious drizzle on each cookie, but if you want to slather your cookies, by all means, double the recipe.

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Filed under Baked, Recipe, Sweets

Deskmates 3: Early Harvest

Every fall, Angel and I await the return of The Grapes. Their name is always capitalized because they’re good enough to merit it. Officially, they’re a variety called Reliance, but that doesn’t quite cover how great they are. They’re not just any juicy red grapes, they’re bursting with the tangy grape-y flavor of Concords, though seedless and not quite as tannic. (I also love Concords, both the seedless and seeded varieties.) We first came across The Grapes at farm stands in upstate New York a few years ago, and ever since, we’ve hunted them down in the city greenmarkets.

One of my new favorite apple varieties is the Spitzenburg, and I’m in good company because apparently it was Thomas Jefferson’s favorite apple. I’m not quite sure where that bit of trivia comes from, unless there’s a piece of vellum somewhere listing Teenbeat-style likes and dislikes of the hunky 3rd president. Anyway, the Spitzenburg is firm and juicy, with light cider and lemon notes. I always choose apples that still have leaves attached. It gives them so much more character, don’t you think? This particular apple was doubly attractive because in addition to its two perky leaves, it also has three dried flower buds. It was the only blossom among its four branchmates to survive into applehood.

It’s a well-known fact that I am partial to purple vegetables. But really, I could take or leave any of the other purple vegetables (potatoes, cauliflower, broccoli, onions, kale) – as long as I could still have their paler siblings, of course. These purple carrots are the ones I really love. It just makes me so happy to slice one open and see its bright orange heart and little orange veins poking through the purple layer. One of my long-held food theories is that colors affect taste (really, if you ate a spinach leaf or a raspberry blindfolded, you’d know what color it was). I think these have a slight bittersweet edge and a hint of fruit flavor. They can keep their color if cooked carefully, but more often than not, they just dye the rest of the food they touch.

The dusky apple in the foreground is an experimental hybrid called NY 428. (Behind it is a Honeycrisp, the indie darling of the apple world). According to its label at the greenmarket, the NY 428 has excellent flavor but does not last long in storage, so it never got a real name. It does indeed have good flavor; it’s fruity, tart, and slightly vinuous. I don’t remember its parentage, but it has some of the qualities of Winesap and Macoun apples. It would make a killer pie, I think, and I’m hoping to test it soon.

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Filed under Deskmates, Fruit, Things I Did Not Cook, Vegetables, Work Lunch